The Future of High Performance Computing: May 18 in St. Louis

The Future of High Performance Computing

Join us at this free stlhpc.net event to learn how High Performance Computing (HPC) can be applied to your organization and your research. Come hear industry experts from HP and Intel who will present their insights on trends shaping the future of HPC. Discover how HPC is enabling researchers to comprehensively map the human brain’s circuitry in 1,200 healthy adults as part of the Human Connectome Project. Learn how HPC can be applied in other industries to lower costs, increase innovation, decrease time to market and increase discoveries.

Featuring:

  • Marc Hamilton – Vice President, High Performance Computing, HP
  • David Van Essen, Ph.D. – Edison Professor of Neurobiology; Chair, Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology, Washington University in St. Louis
  • Fred Prior, Ph.D. – Director of the Electronic Radiology Laboratory of the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology; Research Associate Professor of Radiology, Washington University in Saint Louis
  • Greg Reiff – Strategic Technology Manager, Intel
  • Gary Stiehr – Founder, stlhpc.net; Information Systems Group Leader at The Genome Institute at Washington University in Saint Louis

Join the conversation on Twitter: use #STLhpc

Agenda:

Start End Session Description
8:00
9:00 Registration, Continental Breakfast, Networking
9:00
9:30

The Human Connectome Project

David Van Essen, Ph.D., Fred Prior, Ph.D.

Understanding the human brain is one of the great scientific
challenges of the 21st century. The Human Connectome Project represents a concerted attack on a key aspect of this challenge:
elucidating the neural pathways that underlie brain function. Deciphering this amazingly complex wiring diagram will reveal much about what makes us uniquely human and what makes every person different from all others.

This project will generate over a petabyte of high-resolution MRI image data and highly interconnected graph-based data. Analyzing and sharing this data will require High Performance Computing resources, new algorithms and new data management and sharing systems.

9:30
9:45

stlhpc.net :: St. Louis High Performance Computing

Gary Stiehr

High Performance Computing has been applied in many industries to lower costs, increase innovation, decrease time to market and increase discoveries. What are some examples of how HPC is being used in other industries? How does stlhpc.net hope to contribute to growth in St. Louis by spotlighting, connecting and building upon local HPC expertise and helping local organizations leverage their use of HPC? Find out about current and future uses of HPC in St. Louis and how you can get involved.

9:45
10:15 Refreshements and Networking break
10:15
11:00

Enabling Discovery: Key HPC Technologies and Trends

Gregory Reiff

As High Performance Computing systems become more powerful they drive more discovery. From both academic and commercial perspectives, come hear the trends and technologies that Intel sees as important for transitioning from Terascale to Petascale to Exascale computing.

11:00
12:00

GPU Computing, The Third Wave of High Performance Computing

Marc Hamilton

Modern day high performance computing has been driven by three major trends over the last 10 years. The first was the broad adoption of x86 clusters running Linux which started to dominate the HPC landscape last decade. The second was the broad adoption of multi-core x86 processors and low latency infiniband networking which started about five years ago. Today we are entering an inflection point with the third wave of industry standard HPC computing. While GPUs today power 4 of the top 5 supercomputers in the world, GPUs aren’t just for the world’s elite supercomputer centers. Driven by new software technologies including CUDA and OpenCL, GPUs are power HPC for the masses, bring new levels of HPC affordability across the entire range of supercomputer, delivering for the first time over a teraflop of performance per rack unit and scaling to the world’s most power efficient production supercomputers.

About the Speakers:

Marc Hamilton – Vice President, High Performance Computing, HP

Marc is vice president for HPC in HP’s Enterprise Storage, Servers, and Networking business unit where he leads the HPC team for the Americas region. He brings more than 26 years of global sales and executive management experience to HP. Marc’s team works across HP engineering, marketing, and sales organizations as well as HP Labs to design, develop, and deliver world class HPC systems, ranging from some of the world’s fastest supercomputers installed at national research labs and leading universities to commercial HPC systems across a variety of industries including energy, manufacturing, financial services, and life sciences. Prior to joining HP in October 2010, Marc spent 16 years at Sun Microsystems and Oracle in HPC and other sales and marketing executive management roles. At Sun, his team built a number of systems that placed in the top 10 of the Top500 list of the world’s fastest supercomputers, including systems at Sandia National Labs, Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC), Germany’s Juelich supercomputing center, and the Tokyo Institute of Technology. Prior to Sun, Marc worked at TRW developing HPC applications for the US aerospace and defense industry. He has published a number of technical articles and is the author of the book, “Software Development, Building Reliable Systems”. Marc holds a BS degree in Math and Computer Science from UCLA, an MS degree in Electrical Engineering from USC, and is a graduate of the UCLA Executive Management program. http://marchamilton.wordpress.com/

David Van Essen, Ph.D. – Edison Professor of Neurobiology; Chair, Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology, Washington University in St. Louis

David C. Van Essen, Ph.D. is Edison Professor and Head of the Anatomy & Neurobiology Department at Washington University in St. Louis. His physiological and anatomical studies of macaque visual cortex provide many insights into functional specialization within this distributed hierarchical system. He has pioneered the use of surface-based atlases for visualizing and analyzing cortical structure, function, development, and connectivity and for making comparisons across studies and across species. His tension-based theory of morphogenesis accounts for how and why the cortex gets its folds. His studies of human cerebral cortex provide insights regarding normal variability, abnormalities in specific diseases, and patterns of cortical development. He has served as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Neuroscience, founding chair of the OHBM, and President of the Society for Neuroscience. He is a fellow of the AAAS and has received the Raven Lifetime Achievement Award from the St. Louis Academy of Sciences and the Krieg Cortical Discoverrer Award from the Cajal Club. Along with Kamil Ugurbil, he is PI of the Human Connectome Project, a $30 million NIH grant to map brain circuitry in a large population of healthy adults using cutting-edge neuroimaging methods. http://brainvis.wustl.edu/wiki

Fred Prior, Ph.D. – Director of the Electronic Radiology Laboratory of the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology; Research Associate Professor of Radiology, Washington University in Saint Louis

Fred Prior, Ph.D. (CS), MS (BME), MA (Anthro), BA (Chem) is the Director of the Electronic Radiology Laboratory of the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, and a Research Associate Professor of Radiology, Washington University in Saint Louis School of Medicine. Dr. Prior has over 30 years of R&D experience focused mostly on the design of advanced medical information management and communication technologies. He has worked in a variety of R&D environments ranging from Silicon Valley startups to major multi-national corporations in the US and Europe. He has held senior management positions with Imatron, Siemens Medical Systems, Philips Medical System, Cemax-Icon and Eastman Kodak and was formerly a member of the faculty of the departments of Radiology, Neuroscience and Bioengineering at Penn State University College of Medicine.
http://erl.wustl.edu/

Greg Reiff – Strategic Technology Manager, Intel

Gary Stiehr – Founder, stlhpc.net; Information Systems Group Leader at The Genome Institute at Washington University in Saint Louis

Gary has over eleven years of experience in High Performance Computing (HPC) environments. He leads the Information Systems group at The Genome Institute at Washington University in St. Louis, which manages the HPC systems used to analyze the genetic basis of cancer and other diseases. Also, he has recently started stlhpc.net, which has quickly become the focal point for HPC activity in St. Louis and aims to contribute to growth in St. Louis through the application of High Performance Computing. Prior to joining The Genome Institute, Gary worked in the Computing Division at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) as part of the U.S. CMS Tier-1 Facilities team building and supporting the Tier-1 regional computing center as part of the Worldwide Large Hadron Collider Computing Grid. Prior to Fermilab, Gary led the development and adoption of high performance computing resources by University research groups at the University of Missouri – St. Louis. http://stlhpc.net ; http://genome.wustl.edu

Our Sponsors:

Thank you to HP and Intel for sponsoring this stlhpc.net event.

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